What Are Related Services? Part 3 of 3

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I apologize!  I thought I had posted part 3 of this series a while back!

Today’s blog is the last post in a three-part series.  In this series we are discussing the related services component of the ARD (IEP) document.   In the first post of this series I discussed related services in general including the definition of related services.  In the second post, I listed out and defined some common related services. In today’s post we are going to look at how you go about obtaining related services for your child.   Continue reading

What Are Related Services? Part 2 of 3

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Today’s blog is the second in a three-part series.  In this series we are discussing the related services component of the ARD (IEP) document.  In today’s post we are going to look at common related services and their definition according to IDEA.  In first post of this series I discussed related services in general including the definition of related services.  In final post of this series, I will discuss how to obtain related services for your child. Continue reading

What Are Related Services? Part 1 of 3

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Today’s blog is the first in a three part series.  We will be discussing the related services component of the ARD (IEP) document.  In today’s post I am going to give you the definition of related services according to IDEA.  In the next post I am going to list out some of the common related services and their definitions.  The third post will explain how to get related services for you child.

Your child’s ARD (IEP) document must contain a statement of the supplementary aides and related services that your child is receiving.  Related services are services that are necessary for your child to benefit from their special education program.  They can help your child access the general education curriculum, meet their IEP goals, and/or participate in extracurricular and nonacademic activities.

Related services can be either through direct or indirect (consultative) methods.  These services can be provided in your child’s classroom, through pull out services, before or after school or in your home (in home training).   They can be provided individually or in a group.  Related services are not disability specific are meant to meet the individual needs of the child.  The third part of this series will cover the provision of related services in more detail.

According to IDEA:

Sec. 300.34 Related services.

(a) General. Related services means transportation and such developmental, corrective, and other supportive services as are required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education, and includes speech-language pathology and audiology services, interpreting services, psychological services, physical and occupational therapy, recreation, including therapeutic recreation, early identification and assessment of disabilities in children, counseling services, including rehabilitation counseling, orientation and mobility services, and medical services for diagnostic or evaluation purposes. Related services also include school health services and school nurse services, social work services in schools, and parent counseling and training.

Related Services does not include:

(b) Exception; services that apply to children with surgically implanted devices, including cochlear implants.

(1) Related services do not include a medical device that is surgically implanted, the optimization of that device’s functioning (e.g., mapping), maintenance of that device, or the replacement of that device.

(2) Nothing in paragraph (b)(1) of this section– (i) Limits the right of a child with a surgically implanted device (e.g., cochlear implant) to receive related services (as listed in paragraph (a) of this section) that are determined by the IEP Team to be necessary for the child to receive FAPE.

(ii) Limits the responsibility of a public agency to appropriately monitor and maintain medical devices that are needed to maintain the health and safety of the child, including breathing, nutrition, or operation of other bodily functions, while the child is transported to and from school or is at school; or

(iii) Prevents the routine checking of an external component of a surgically-implanted device to make sure it is functioning properly, as required in Sec. 300.113(b).

This post is intended to give you a general idea of the law.  However, each situation is different.  If you need more specific information about how the law applies to your situation you should contact a special education attorney.  

References:

“IDEA – Building The Legacy of IDEA 2004.” IDEA – Building The Legacy of IDEA 2004, idea.ed.gov/explore/view/p/,root,regs,300,A,300%252E34.

BOCES, Erie 1. “What are related services for students with disabilities and how are they.” Erie 1 BOCES > Home, http://www.e1b.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=n7uCRE5KYeA%3D&tabid=2978&mid=5432.

“The Individuals with Disabilities Education.” PACER Center – Assistance for Children with Disabilities, Bullying Prevention, Parent Workshops, http://www.pacer.org/parent/php/php-c181.pdf.

“Related Services.” Center for Parent Information and Resources, http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/iep-relatedservices/.

The 13 Federal Mandates Related to IEP Goals

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I came across this guide and found it very informative in breaking down IEP goals and the mandates that are tied to them.

This SMARTER Steps Federal Mandate Guide is for school staff and parents. It reviews the 13 federal requirements of Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals in user-friendly format. The legal jargon and expectations can be overwhelming to teams. This Guide helps teams understand the 13 federal mandates surrounding goal development. This Guide can help teams create compliant IEP goals so students have success.

You can find more resources on their website.

This post is intended to give you a general idea of the law.  However, each situation is different.  If you need more specific information about how the law applies to your situation you should contact a special education attorney.  

Toolbox Tips for Parents #5: The Texas Legal Framework website

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The Legal Framework is a joint project between the Texas Education Agency and Region 18 Education Service Center.  The website contains links to both Texas Special Education law and Federal Special Education law.  You can search the law by topic (i.e. Evaluations).  Some of the other information contained on this site:

  • Notice of Procedural Safeguards (both in English and Spanish)
  • Admission, Review and Dismissal Guide (both in English and Spanish)

You can enter the district in which your child attends and pull up board policies for your district that pertain to the topic or area of law you are researching.

The Legal Framework

U.S. Department of Education Issues Guidance on Dyslexia

The U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services released a letter today giving guidance to states and schools on the use of the terms dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia in evaluations, eligibility determinations, and IEP documents. Continue reading

2016 Accommodations for STAAR

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October 20, 2015 Update:  A new training titled “Supplemental Aids for STAAR, STAAR Spanish, STAAR L, and STAAR A:  What’s Allowed and What’s Not?” has been added to the page.  Supplementary aids are paper-based resources such as: mnemonic devices (PEMDAS); graphic organizers; math charts; grade-appropriate grammar and mechanics rules; graphics for Science; formula Triangles for Science; blank maps for Social Studies; and timelines for Social Studies.

September 22, 2015: 

The Texas Education Agency has created a page for the 2016 Accommodations for Students with Disabilities.  The Accommodations manual has not yet been released.  I will keep this post updated with the link once the accommodations for the 2016 STAAR Tests have been posted.

Policy Statement on Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Early Childhood Practices

ECIThe U.S. Department of  Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Education issued a policy statement this week on the inclusion of children with disabilities in early childhood programs.  This policy statement is to provide recommendations for state and local education agencies for increasing the inclusion of children birth through age 5 with a disability in high-quality early childhood programs.  It is the position of both Departments that “all young children with disabilities should have access to inclusive high-quality early childhood programs, where they are provided with individualized and appropriate support in meeting high expectations.”

The statement goes on to give an overview of ADA, the basis for inclusion, and a path for addressing the challenges and barriers to inclusion in early childhood programs.

Toolbox Tips for Parents #4: Wrightslaw Website

Parent Resources

Wrightslaw is a website for parents, educators, advocates, and attorneys to come to for accurate, reliable information about special education law, education law, and advocacy for children with disabilities.  As a parent I relied heavily on this website for information to help me advocate for my daughter.  As an advocate, I still come to this website for information to help me advocate for the families I work with.

Toolbox Tips for Parents #2: iAdvocate App

tipsThe iAdvocate app is a free app developed at the Syracuse University School of Education.  The app grew out of a need to provide resources for parents of students with disabilities.  According to the developers:  “the goal of iAdvocate is to share and develop specific strategies with parents for working collaboratively with a school team to improve their children’s education. iAdvocate uses problem-based learning strategies, simulations, and provides contextual access resources to build parental advocacy skills and knowledge.”

This is a wonderful app to download and have ready for when you attend ARD (IEP) meetings.  The app is available in the App Store and on Google Play.

More Information:

This post is intended to give you a general idea of the law.  However, each situation is different.  If you need more specific information about how the law applies to your situation you should contact a special education attorney.